The Weakley County Reconciliation Project (WCRP) believes that conversations based on discovery and acknowledgment of our shared history are critical to the success of our community and region. Our work is to learn who we are and how we can be better. We are creating a social environment where civil, mature, and respectful conversations happen while learning who we are and how we can be better. Rather than blaming, shaming, or accusing anyone, we embrace our uniqueness and diversity and seek to use these qualities to fuel our continued progress toward becoming a leading community in Northwest Tennessee. Whatever your experience or perspective, we want to hear from you.


Contact: WeakleyReconciliation@gmail.com    Facebook Group: Weakley County Reconciliation Project

 


08/14/2021 General Meeting Recording
Civil War/Confederate Monuments, Dr. David Coffey

Dr. Coffey joined us to reprise his talk from the 2021 Civil Rights Conference on the Civil War and America’s love/hate relationship with the Confederate Flag and Confederate Monuments. His talk comes in the context of the recent removal of Nathan Bedford Forrest’s status from the Tennessee Statehouse.


FACEBOOK FEED: Weakley County Reconciliation Project Group

2 weeks ago

For anyone following WCRP who might be interested in joining our discussion of Resmaa Menakem's book, My Grandmother's Hands... ...
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3 weeks ago

I thought some of our WCRP folks would find this expression of grief at the passing forward of Archbishop Tutu--and the call to action--powerful.Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu was rare because he understood what peace actually means.He knew that it isn't surrender. He knew that it isn't ornamental, sentimental, or symbolic. He knew that it means an end to ALL violence: physical, psychological, emotional, spiritual, economic, and environmental. Which means that he knew that the responsibility of peace falls upon the transgressor, not the transgressed. He was the first, and perhaps only, Christian I've ever encountered who actually took the best, most loving, most freeing parts of the Jesus Christ myth seriously, while never denying the inherent colonial, violent, anti-Black aspects of the religion and its practices. Which is to say that he knew how to subvert and divert its power for the purposes of REAL liberation, even if that strategy ultimately failed. While just about every other Christian in the world was building their altars out of the bones of queer and trans people, he proclaimed loudly that the true sin was in the oppression of LGBTQIA+ people.Peace is not synonymous with foolishness, as Archbishop, now Ancestor, Desmond Tutu articulates in this article he wrote back in 2011: "[H]ealing is a process. How we deal with the truth after its telling defines the success of the process." (SOURCE: mg.co.za/article/2014-04-24-unfinished-business-of-the-trc-healing/)And we know how truth is dealt with in the world: It is ignored. Cast out. Starved. Killed. Buried. Given its opponent's name. Which is why Ancestor Tutu's death deals such a devastating blow to corporeal existence. We are losing our truthtellers in a time when the assault on truth is corporate technology, secured on the pointy ends of mobs' pitchforks. Dearest Ancestor Tutu,If anyone has earned their rest, it is you. If there is anyone who has left us with the tools we need to finally end harm and injustice, it is you. We need only to heed the lessons and magnify them, multiply them by additional love and truth. And in your homegoing, I am certain the Ancestors have prepared a bounty the likes of which you have never seen. And all the compassion you have displayed during your nearly-a-century on this plane shall forever surround you in the endless stretch of Blackness we call Cosmos.May joy and laughter and dancing be yours forever and ever. Aṣẹ. Image description: Archbishop Desmond Tutu halo-lit against a black background. He is seen from the chest up, wearing black, wearing eyeglasses, looking toward the left, smiling. (Photo By Stephen Voss/Redux/eyevine) ...
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2 months ago

I was in a workshop a few months ago and heard a white male facilitator say: "whiteness is rarely experienced by people who are white."Today supports his statement! Think it through! ...
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